BAY AREA GROUP RIDE - HOSTED BY IRON & RESIN / LED BY @SFDOGGERWALKER

If you want to hook up with riders leaving from San Francisco, Iron and Resin will be hosting a free breakfast and kick off location July 21st! Lead by San Francisco's premier dog walker, @SFDOGGERWALKER! 

Address: 7 Columbus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94111

Read more about Iron and Resin's SF store by clicking HERE

Mikey and his beloved Stevie. Rest in Peace beautiful Stevie <3 

Mikey and his beloved Stevie. Rest in Peace beautiful Stevie <3 

A MINUTE W/ CHRIS SMITH OF THE WICK MOTO - SEATTLE, WA

You meet the nicest people on two wheels. Take a minute and get to know a Sierra Stake Out contributor all the way from Seattle Washington, Chris Smith, his favorite moto trip to date (holy hell it's a good one!) and learn more about his coffee and moto shop The Wick Moto. Thank you again to the crew over at The Wick Moto for generously donating to the SSO raffle!

The Wick is a location where the motorcycle community can come together.   We offer coffee, multiple taps for beer and wine, Cafe fair and food. We sponsor multiple events including Seattle's "Riders Show" @riders_show. Seattle's Distinguished Gentleman's Ride,  Scarecrow Moto (a small dirt Moto camp trip where we set up a theater screen and show horror movies, drive in style) and other misc. events. Insta: @thewickmoto

My name is Chris Smith and I am the original founder of this little Wick Moto Cafe idea. About 15 years ago a friend told me his neighbor had a motorcycle buried in thorn bushes that her late husband had left there a decade before.  I was able to hook it with a chain and drag it out sideways with my truck.   It turned out to be a 1970 XS650. I had it running by the end of the day and a friend showed me pics of cafe racers (I had no idea what that was) but proceeded to spend the next week turning it into one of them things. After that I was hooked, started buying every bike under $500 bucks I could find just to fix up and sell. I didn't  get my endorsement for years.  I moved to Seattle for work, got involved with the Moto community and everything snowballed from there. 

I have about 10 bikes now. I tend to beat up on my 04' Sportster the most. Most modifications were made with a grinder. Probably crashed it a dozen times but it's tough as hell and keeps going. I guess I could mention my 74 RD200. I found it in a dudes basement, rebuilt the motor with go fast parts so I could race it and after new paint, suspension and "Larson" upholstery seat I just stuck it in my bedroom and called it good. It now lives in the cafe. 

Within our walls we showcase multiple like minded businesses such as "Pack Animal" that offers handmade Moto travel gear.  "Larson Upholstery" offering custom leather seats and gear.  And Moto Shed offering DIY and full mechanic services with fabrication and storage.   

The Wick Moto crew looks like a good time!&nbsp;

The Wick Moto crew looks like a good time! 

Best Moto trip was from Seattle to Bend Oregon landed in Portland to meet up with a group called "the poor sports" (sportster only club) for my buddies bachelor party.  Got so drunk and got into a fight cause my cigarette fell in a girls butt and her boyfriend was pissed.  Woke up in the back of a truck and we all did a hangover ride through a rain storm so bad our bikes were stalling out. Went over a pass and it started to snow and our gear started to freeze. Pulled over a few times to try and warm up with some hair of the dog and let the man of honor puke. We finally landed in Smith Rock where an old dude let us camp on his property and cause a ruckus. Drank too much again and fell down a hill without my shoes on and broke my toe. Went to town to get a bandage and an old lady told us to get the hell out then burned out in her old ford.   Don't remember the ride back but it wasn't bad.  All in all, best Moto camp trip I ever had. 

Open 7 days a week!

Open 7 days a week!

Get Directions

Phone number(253) 318-5718

Business website thewickmoto.com

  • Mon 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
  • Tue 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
  • Wed 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
  • Thu 7:00 am - 8:00 pm
  • Fri 7:00 am - 10:00 pm
  • Sat 8:00 am - 10:00 pm
  • Sun 8:00 am - 8:00 pm

A MINUTE W/ BILL BRYANT OF BILTWELL

I met Bill a little over 5 years ago when I started dating one of his employees (simmer down, I married that guy 2 years later). Bill in his t-shirts, running shoes, dirty jeans, with blackened hands from some motorcycle project came across as humble, kind, and the sort of guy you'd want in your corner. He is a family man first and foremost which shows in the way he treats other people and on any given day you talk to him, he is working on a brand new project whether it be a product for Biltwell, bike build, or event. Bill is headed up to the Sierra Stake Out with the rest of the Biltwell crew and plans on doing some sightseeing along the way, after all, their motto is "Ride Motorcycles Have Fun" and these guys truly live by it. Take a minute and get to know a little more about the man behind Biltwell, Bill Bryant. 

Lake Lundy is one of my favorite places to camp along the 395. It’s mostly shaded and the sites are small and first-come-first-serve so it’s usually easy to get a nice spot without a bunch of uptight RV’ers riffing your chill. Photo by  @twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

Lake Lundy is one of my favorite places to camp along the 395. It’s mostly shaded and the sites are small and first-come-first-serve so it’s usually easy to get a nice spot without a bunch of uptight RV’ers riffing your chill. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Tell us a little about yourself and how you got into motorcycling:

I’ve been a gearhead since I was a little kid. I was always obsessed with cool cars, off road stuff, motorcycles, anything that I could work on and make better (which was sometimes questionable). I bought a dual sport for commuting and trail riding around 1999. Once I discovered how fun it was to ride on the street, I was hooked. It’s been a downward spiral ever since. 

It took me a couple versions of this bike to get it exactly where I want it and now it’s there and I’m just gonna leave it alone. Nothing fancy, but it’s all solid and it fits me perfectly. Photo by  @twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

It took me a couple versions of this bike to get it exactly where I want it and now it’s there and I’m just gonna leave it alone. Nothing fancy, but it’s all solid and it fits me perfectly. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Current bike(s) you’ve got & what modifications you’ve done:

I have a motorcycle problem. 75 shovelhead chopper, 79 TT500 race bike, S&S shovel chopper and my keeper: 92 Harley FXR. That’s the one that I’ll be riding up to the Sierra Stakeout. It’s an 80” with all S&S guts, Dyna dual disc front end with big Tokicos. I’m stoked on some ADV-style mounts and bags from Grim Cycle that we just mounted up. This will be the first trip with a bike that is actually set up to haul a bunch of stuff so I’m looking forward to all that practicality. 

Best bike ever made. Motorcycles come and go, but I’ve got a long term relationship with this one. I can’t wait to ride it to the Sierra Stakeout. Photo by  @twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

Best bike ever made. Motorcycles come and go, but I’ve got a long term relationship with this one. I can’t wait to ride it to the Sierra Stakeout. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Tell us about what you do and how you got into it and how long you’ve been doing it:

That’s a tough one for me because I’m old have done a bunch of different stuff. I’ve been a graphic designer since around 1991. I’m involved in everything Biltwell does, but the design and branding work is really my lane. I also dabble in management, trying to figure out how best to enable our team to kick ass. I’m no MBA, just a self-taught, former Marine, art nerd, serial entrepreneur trying to do whatever he can to earn a living.

Best moto route / camping trip you’ve ever been on: 

I probably have to say Baja. I’ve ridden to the bottom and back a couple times and it is always an adventure. I love riding a rigid chopper and parking next to some couple on expensive ADV bikes in some out of the way spot that’s a thousand miles from the border. They always ask, “Did you really ride that all the way down here?” I like minimalist stuff, so riding a bike somewhere like that is always satisfying.

This 93” S&amp;S chopper is a fire-breathing, mile-eating machine that my friends and I built last year. Photo by  @twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

This 93” S&S chopper is a fire-breathing, mile-eating machine that my friends and I built last year. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Have you ridden the Sierra Nevada area?

I love both sides of the Sierras and have ridden most of the highways and passed which all have their own appeal. The passes through Yosemite are always gorgeous but can be too busy on a weekend. The 395 is awesome and as many times as I've done it, there’s always more to learn and explore. I love the 49 from Oakhurst to Placerville. Maybe the most enjoyable route to me is highway 70 along the Feather River. Not too crowded, plenty twisty, neat bridges, great fishing and swimming. It’s basically perfect. I haven’t done much north of there, but after the SS, we’re going to ride for another week through Shasta, Eureka, etc and end up in Santa Cruz the following weekend for the Redwood Rumble. Then we’ll ride home. The whole trip is gonna be about 2700 miles, all in California. Can’t wait.

I have a fetish for riding bridges and tunnels. I don’t know what it is, but they trip me out on a bike, so I get stoked whenever we ride over exceptional bridges like this unit on the Feather River, Hwy 70, west of Belden. Photo by  @twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

I have a fetish for riding bridges and tunnels. I don’t know what it is, but they trip me out on a bike, so I get stoked whenever we ride over exceptional bridges like this unit on the Feather River, Hwy 70, west of Belden. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Who are you rolling with to the Sierra Stake Out and which route are you planning to take there? 

It’ll be a 5-10 person crew from Biltwell and a couple friends. Our first night is going to be in Oakhurst, then over why 120 to 395 and up to the 80 to meet up with you guys. 

After jamming all day, going over nuts and bolts every night at camp is a good way to keep little problems from becoming big problems. Photo by &nbsp;@twoforsixer  / Geoff Kowalchuk

After jamming all day, going over nuts and bolts every night at camp is a good way to keep little problems from becoming big problems. Photo by @twoforsixer / Geoff Kowalchuk

Other events produced by the good guys at Biltwell that you should check out:

Nor Cal Swap , Sacramento CA July 23rd (hit this on your way home from the SSO)

Off Road Swap, Lake Elsinore CA Sept 2nd

Kernville Kampout, Kernville CA Oct 6-8

 

 


 

 


 


 

A MINUTE W/ THOR DRAKE FROM SEE SEE MOTORCYCLES

Our buds over at See See Motorcycles are a lot like us. They can't sit still and always want to do stuff on two wheels. The guys and gals that make the store and brand what it is, decided to open up a See See Motorcycles Reno, just an hour away from the Sierra Stake Out. We suggest stopping if you are rolling through for a caffeinated beverage and see the store which is sister to it's Portland counterpart. Even though the team can't physically make it to SSO (they will be producing Dirt Quake  in Castle Rock WA) they still wanted to contribute to the event with a killer raffle prize. Take a minute and get to know Thor Drake and why they decided Reno Nevada was prime to open up a second location. 

 

Out of all the places See See could open it second store, why Reno?

We love Reno, It's a pretty old city with interesting history. It has a big bike culture and a lot more sun to support motorcycling. a lot of young artist /designers are moving there because it's still semi affordable. Biggest thing for us is the exact reason you would ask the question...there are a lot of places that would be great , so-cal, Chicago, I think See See would work pretty much anyplace, but Reno isn't the expected, it's like humble-cool.


 
What were the biggest challenges of opening a new premises in Reno?

As with anything it's the money, we are building with a limited tool chest. Both George and I have essentially put everything back into the company in order to grow. We also spread ourselves extra thin by opening a KTM dealership in portland at the same time. It's been lots and lots of work between the both.  
 
What differs between the two branches? Could be details, attitude, whatever?

We wanted to make the two feel like brother and sister. Both buildings are 1920's brick buildings right down town. Both places where almost ready to be bulldozed. A lot of the buildout on both places reused old metal and wood. Its my opinion that old stuff always looks better even if its way off perfect. However the Reno location is a little more polished. We added a bit more time in the buildout and had to do it a bit more pro because we couldn't do it all ourselves. 


 
Is it easier opening a second store than a first?

The sequel is always harder to make better than the original, but with everything we do we always challenge ourselves to make it better, i think for this reason it makes it exponentially harder. Im extremely pleased with the buildout,the next step will be to create the same sense of community and excitement as the Portland location. 


 
Describe the build-out - can the second branch ever get the love the first born did? Give details of the love lavished on Reno.

We think it got a bit more to be honest, over the last five years we have been dreaming of ways to improve See See Portland, we finally got our chance. The really nice thing about Reno is everything is updated, It still has the old vibe, we just updated all the guts of the space.  
 
What’s unique about the Reno store that?

It's still in its growing stages, hard to tell right now. I think it will change over the next year. Kind of exciting even for me to see!


 
Is See See Reno helping make America Great again?

Haha, I think our captain orange guy has already claimed that job. We just love motorcycles, it has been good to us and we want to keep giving that to others.  
 
What are the immediate plans to make Reno a success?

We started with a 21 Helmets event. Bringing together 21 artists to customize 21 Helmets. It was a great event, the place was packed and we splashed a little beer on it to christen the space. We hope to do some racing, some more art events, basically just get people together for a good time.     
 
What’s next for See See in general?

Dirt Quake USA #4! - our 4th fucking year! Pretty crazy. after that I think I may take a year to focus on the things we currently do. But... who knows it's hard for me to say no. 


 
Can you see a third See See opening in the future. If so, which cities are on the short list. 

Japan! that would make me happy...funny thing I have never been, but I just know I would like it.

A Minute With Matthew Allard of Inked Iron

When we launched the Sierra Stake Out, Matthew Allard of Inked Iron was one of the first people we did not know that reached out to support the event. Take a minute to get to know the artist/owner behind the San Rafael, CA brand.

What inspired you to start Inked Iron/What do you make?

About 14-15 years ago I put myself through art school to improve my Photoshop and web design skills. I was playing in two bands at the time and we needed flyers and websites. I wanted to get out of the warehouse I was working in, and had taken full custody of my son who was about 5 years old at the time. At that point I had a BMW, which I had been gifted from my pops, and a brand new Triumph … and was barely getting by - I was determined to outfit my garage with artwork and tools, etc. I had the tools, so that was cool. Started looking at art and was stunned at the prices. I was finding existing moto art going for $80-120 a print! WTF!?! So I decided to put my skills to the test and make art for my own garage. And I did! I was psyched. It looked more like coffeeshop art, so I ran with it. Went down to a local printer to print one and they told me one print would cost $45. Then they told me they would print 25 of each (I had 5 pieces) for $35/set. I did the math pretty quickly and walked out of there a few days later with 125 prints. I threw them on Etsy and a couple of the prints sold out in two weeks. Boom – money for parts!

About a week after that, Ginger from New Church Moto reached out to me. We’d been following each other on Instagram, because she had done some custom leatherwork on my BMW seat. Turns out she curates the art for the One Moto Show in Portland, Oregon. She invited me to put the art on the walls behind the bikes along with all of the other incredible artists making motorcycle art. I was humbled and felt outclassed, but the feedback was unbelievable. I left the 1 Moto about $500 richer, minus lodging… but thought to myself “shit I should brand this and make it a thing!”.

After the 1 Moto Show, I had a t-shirt printer call me and tell me they wanted to print my art on t-shirts. I thought… why fucking not! I can put em up in a shop online and probably re-purpose my old portfolio website into a motorcycle art website, and hence Inked Iron was born.

Since then, I’ve been doing more and more shows. I’ve had art up at the 1 Moto 4 years in a row now, and started vending the day they allowed vending at the show. The family up there is incredible. So real. So true. I started meeting more and more people in the motorcycle community and now literally every show I go to, it’s family. Same folks, new folks, shenanigans, etc. So much fun.

Recently I’ve been authorized as a dealer for Biltwell. This is exciting as it’ll allow me to offer more to my customers. This is a result of the consistent inquiries I get from show goers when they see my Handlebar Field Guide and think I sell bars. I’ve always had the reply… “no, it’s art.” and had to turn them away. At this point I have a handlebar display stocked with most of the bars they offer, as well as helmets, grips and the odd foot peg and saddlebag. Honored to be part of the Biltwell family.

The end goal was always brick & mortar with coffee shop and motorcycle repair shop, but that was early on. I didn’t know the cost of rent here in the bay area and it’s outrageous. I would need a serious investor if I wanted to pull that off. Here’s to the possibilities that lie ahead. May they come swiftly or at least… before I’m dead.

Tell us a little about yourself and how you got into motorcycling:

I was born in England, and my family moved out to California in 1976. I’ve always ridden motorcycles, since I was a kid. Dad always had them around and rode daily, mostly BMW’s, but the odd Norton and Triumph, etc. I didn’t own a street bike until about 8 years ago, or so when my Dad gifted me his old ’83 BMW R80. I’ve torn it down to the frame to do a custom build. Originally it was going to be a café racer, but at this point I’m looking at building a Gas Box inspired bobber or something unique like that. I bought a Triumph Thruxton as a daily rider to ride while I’m working on the BMW. Always wanted an old Triumph or Harley chopper, but that’s down the road. The goal is to start building one once I’m done with the BMW.

Current bike(s) you’ve got & what modifications you’ve done:

2013 Triumph Thruxton – Black. Modifications include: British Customs Predator exhaust, air injector delete, modified gauge cluster, Analog Motorcycles A3T Fender Eliminator, Progressive 970 rear shocks, Race Tech Front springs, gold valve emulators, Moose Racing header wrap, after market blinkers & mirrors. Next up, new paint.

Best moto route / camping trip you’ve ever been on:

How does one pick from so many epic trips? Shit. Motos in Moab was a blast. It’s one of the farthest trips we’ve done as a group, and between riding bikes around the bonfire, the most insane landscapes where you feel like you’re riding on the moon, and the partying that was had, it is definitely top ranking in the best department.

Have you ridden the Sierra Nevada area? If so, tell us about them in your own words or where you went. If not, tell us what you are looking forward to the most:

I lived up in Nevada City for 8 years. It’s the most amazing area. Nevada City is about 30 minutes from the event space and there’s so much to do up there it’s mind blowing. The roads are a mixture of winding forested roads with the sun bursting through the trees, and straight solid highways that take you up through the mountains to Reno and down to the Central Valley. Prime camping all over, and mountain peaks to climb. The Yuba River is one of the most amazing rivers I’ve seen and swam in. I used to have 4 days off a week and would spend most of them riding down to the river and swimming in the many swimming holes that wind up and down the Yuba valley.

Who are you rolling with to the Sierra Stake Out and which route are you planning to take there?

The crew. We’ve got a solid groups of riders who ride all types of bikes from Harleys to modern vintage Triumphs and old Hondas and Yamahas. It’s a mixed bag but that’s what makes it fun. Unpredictable. Someone always breaks down. We’re heading up American River from the Bay Area which winds up towards Sacramento, jumping on Hwy 80 for a bit and then cutting up Hwy 20 through Grass Valley and Nevada City on up to Cisco Grove. We’ll likely stop for grub at Awful Annie’s in Auburn on the way through. It’s a common stop from the old “Ride to the Pines” with Biltwell the past few years and delicious food. Highly recommended.

Can’t wait to get out of dodge and enjoy some time in the mountains. Good times ahead!

Instagram handle: @inked_iron

Website: http://inkediron.com