DONNER'S FAVORITE CHOPPER ZOMBIE RIDES AGAIN

We are pleased to announce tickets for the Sierra Stake Out 2 are now L I V E! Come camp, dos si do, and ride some of the most beaautiful back roads the Sierras have to offer for 3 days and 2 nights. 

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Welcome to Northern California Gold Country. Home of pine forests, raging rivers, clear lakes, and some of the best riding in the world. The Sierra Stake Out is a 3 day 2 night motorcycle campout. Located at the private Cisco Grove Campground just 70 miles east of Sacramento, this event serves as a prime kick off spot to explore the Sierra Nevadas.

Head over to pristine Lake Tahoe, pay homage to the Donner Party where they met their demise in 1846, cross some epic bridges, or hang back and cool off in our private river fed watering hole. Our campground provides tons of shade, dozens of places to charge equipment, fresh spring water, and even some real bathrooms to accommodate our guests. The grounds feature a fully stocked camp store and a gas station is conveniently located nearby for quick fuel ups before or after your ride for the day. The Sierra Stake Out will also feature live entertainment, a bike show, food truck, raffle, adult beverages, and a fully stocked espresso and coffee bar if you need a little pick me up. Grab your friends, pack up your gear, and join us August 3-5, 2018 for a weekend of moto camping and adventure in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT IS 21+ AND RAIN OR SHINE

Your Ticket Price Includes:

  • 2 nights of camping
  • Bathroom and shower access
  • Route maps for various day rides
  • 2 nights of music and live entertainment
  • Spring fed potable water (this means it's drinkable from the tap) 
  • All you can drink beer (while supplies last)
  • One hell of a weekend

Our Campsite Offerings:

  • Private river and watering hole
  • Fully stocked camp store (beer, snacks, etc for purchase)
  • Food truck on site with breakfast and dinner for purchase
  • Bar with all the mix drinks for purchase
  • Espresso drinks and coffee for purchase
  • Gas station at exit for easy refueling (ATM access) 
  • Gorgeous views of the Sierras
  • Lots of shade and places to hang your hammock. 

Looking for the best route from your location? Click HERE

Want more info? Click HERE

Have questions? Click HERE

FAQs

Is your event all ages? Pet friendly?

The Sierra Stake Out is 21 and up! Since you are allowed to bring in your own adult beverages, we cannot have anyone on the grounds under 21 as we are regulated by the local Sheriff's Department and they have a zero tolerance policy.  NO PETS. 

Are we pre-assigned camping spots?

You'll be able to pick your spot when you arrive. There is tons of room, shade, and bathrooms in the area for your convenience. No,  you won't have a 10 acre plot all to yourself so be ok with getting to know your neighbors. This is what moto camping events are all about. Did we mention there's dozen of places to charge your stuff as well as spigots to fill up your canteen with fresh spring water!?!

Are tickets refundable or transferable? 

We are sorry but we are unable to refund. But you can transfer up until July 27th. Click HERE and do it yourself as the ticket MUST be in the new attendees name.  Sierra Stake Out is not responsible for transferring your tickets. If you miss the deadline, sorry, after July 27th we are in full production and have gone to print. No exceptions, no special one time favors, etc. 

Can I buy multiple tickets? 

You can buy multiple tickets for your group.  However, please realize you will be the sole person in control of collecting and distributing the tickets. Be prepared if you open this can of worms as we don't want to be the ones telling your buddies they can't get in until you show up. 

What does a ticket cover? 

A ticket gets you 2 nights and 3 days camping at our reserved campground, live entertainment & music both nights, a raffle ticket, and all you can drink adult beverages while supplies last. You can expect to get your money's worth as we are big on under promising and over delivering. 

Are Cars / Pull Behind Trailers / RVs Cool?

Cars and Trucks: We do encourage you to ride your motorcycle but understand that “things” happen or you need a chase vehicle.  If you do bring a 4 wheel vehicle, you will have to pay additionally for a Vechicle Pass cause they take up 4 x more room. Moto camping will be in one section and cars in another. They are within a few hundred feet, but the best spots will be reserved for everything on two wheels.

Trailers: Sorry, these will not be allowed into the event space this year due to space restrictions. 

RVS: This event cannot handle rvs/motorhomes at this time.

I am arriving late, what do I do?

We've hired 24/7 check in staff and security to help you get in no matter what time you arrive. We do recommend getting in for the night by 6:00PM as that is when most of the festivities will kick off.

Are services close by?

There is a gas station and a Subway right off the exit for the event site. At the front entrance to the campground, there is a great little convenience store where you can pick up water, snacks, adult beverages, sun screen, and most other general camping supplies (glow sticcckkkksss). 

How do I eat? 

For your convenience, we'll have some vendors on site where you can buy a meal, coffee, and/or adult beverage. These vendors can be expected to be open for breakfast and dinner, but will most likely be closed down during the day while everyone is out exploring the area. Please bring cash as wifi is hit or miss. 

I am a brand and want to get involved, whom do I speak with?

Our events are private so please contact us by emailing sponsors@sierrastakeout.com  prior to sending anyone out on your brand's behalf. 

What type of motos are allowed?

All street legal motorcycles are welcome. 

I don't ride, can I still attend? 

You might get bored during the day while everyone is out riding the local roads but we'd be happy to have you. We hope this event acts as a catalyst to get you on a motorcycle if you decide to come in your car the first time around.

How do I become a vendor?

Sorry, this is a non-vending event. This event is about exploring the Sierra Nevada area on two wheels and making friends around the camp. Ask us how to get involved by emailing sponsors@sierrastakeout.com for sponsor opportunities 

Are you going to have campfires?

We'll have 4 different designated burn barrels set up in the main common area. Besides that, there are no other fires allowed due to excessive fire danger. 

Will this event sell out of tickets?

If you came last year, you know this event sold out so don't drag your feet. It's going to sell out again. 

Are Colors allowed?

Due to our agreements with the campground, we can not allow anyone wearing club colors into the venue. 

THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED TO THE DONNER PARTY

On April 14, 1846, George Donner and his brother Jacob packed their families into covered wagons and left Springfield, Illinois en route to a new life in California. George would later take the lead of the so-called “Donner Party,” a group of westbound emigrants who became trapped in the Sierra Nevada Mountains during one of the most brutal winters on record. The pioneers were forced to spend five months hunkered down in makeshift tents and cabins with almost no food or supplies. By the time they were finally rescued in early 1847, nearly half of them had perished. Many of the rest—including the children—were forced to cannibalize the bodies of the dead to survive. Explore 10 key facts about one of the most gruesome episodes from the era of Westward expansion.

James F. and Margaret (Keyes) Reed, who were members of the Donner Party. (Credit: Public Domain)

James F. and Margaret (Keyes) Reed, who were members of the Donner Party. (Credit: Public Domain)

The Donner Party started its trip dangerously late in the pioneer season.

Travel on the California Trail followed a tight schedule. Emigrants needed to head west late enough in the spring for there to be grass available for their pack animals, but also early enough so they could cross the treacherous western mountain passes before winter. The sweet spot for a departure was usually sometime in mid to late-April, yet for unknown reasons, the core of what became the Donner Party didn’t leave their jumping-off point at Independence, Missouri until May 12. They were the last major pioneer train of 1846, and their late start left them with very little margin for error. “I am beginning to feel alarmed at the tardiness of our movements,” one of the emigrants wrote, “and fearful that winter will find us in the snowy mountains of California.”

They fell behind schedule after taking an untested shortcut.

After reaching Wyoming, most California-bound pioneers followed a route that swooped north through Idaho before turning south and moving across Nevada. In 1846, however, a dishonest guidebook author named Lansford Hastings was promoting a straighter and supposedly quicker path that cut through the Wasatch Mountains and across the Salt Lake Desert. There was just one problem: no one had ever traveled this “Hastings Cutoff” with wagons, not even Hastings himself. Despite the obvious risks—and against the warnings of James Clyman, an experienced mountain man—the 20 Donner Party wagons elected to break off from the usual route and gamble on Hastings’ back road. The decision proved disastrous. The emigrants were forced to blaze much of the trail themselves by cutting down trees, and they nearly died of thirst during a five-day crossing of the salt desert. Rather than saving them time, Hasting’s “shortcut” ended up adding nearly a month to the Donner Party’s journey.

The emigrants lost a race against the weather by just a few days.

Despite the Hastings Cutoff debacle, most of the Donner Party still managed to reach the slopes of the Sierra Nevada by early November 1846. Only a scant hundred miles remained in their trek, but before the pioneers had a chance to drive their wagons through the mountains, an early blizzard blanketed the Sierras in several feet of snow. Mountain passes that were navigable just a day earlier soon transformed into icy roadblocks, forcing the Donner Party to retreat to nearby Truckee Lake and wait out the winter in ramshackle tents and cabins. Much of the group’s supplies and livestock had already been lost on the trail, and it wasn’t long before the first settlers began to perish from starvation.

The majority of the Donner Party emigrants were children.

Like most pioneer trains, the Donner Party was largely made up of family wagons packed with young children and adolescents. Of the 81 people who became stranded at Truckee Lake, more than half were younger than 18 years old, and six were infants. Children also made up the vast majority of the Donner’s Party’s eventual survivors. One of them, one-year-old Isabella Breen, would go on to live until 1935.

Map showing route of the Donner Party. (Credit: Kmusser/Wikimedia Commons)

Map showing route of the Donner Party. (Credit: Kmusser/Wikimedia Commons)

A few pioneers managed to hike to safety.

On December 16, 1846, more than a month after they became snowbound, 15 of the strongest members of the Donner Party strapped on makeshift snowshoes and tried to walk out of the mountains to find help. After wandering the frozen landscape for several days, they were left starving and on the verge of collapse. The hikers resigned themselves to cannibalism and considered drawing lots for a human sacrifice or even having two of the men square off in a duel. Several members of the party soon died naturally, however, so the survivors roasted and consumed their corpses. The gruesome meat gave them the energy they required, and following a month of walking, seven of the original 15 made it to a ranch in California and helped organize rescue efforts. Historians would later dub their desperate hike “The Forlorn Hope.”

A Donner Party member murdered two people for use as food.

During the “Forlorn Hope” expedition, the hiking party included a pair of Indians named Salvador and Luis, both of whom had joined up with the Donner emigrants shortly before they became snowbound. The natives were the only members of the group who refused to engage in cannibalism, and they later ran off out of fear that they might be murdered once the others ran out of meat. When the duo was found days later, exhausted and lying in the snow, an emigrant named William Foster shot both of them in the head. The Indians were then butchered and eaten by the hikers. It was the only time during the entire winter that people were murdered for use as food.

Not all of the emigrants engaged in cannibalism.

As their supplies dwindled, the Donner emigrants stranded at Truckee Lake resorted to eating increasingly grotesque meals. They slaughtered their pack animals, cooked their dogs, gnawed on leftover bones and even boiled the animal hide roofs of their cabins into a foul paste. Several people died from malnutrition, but the rest managed to subsist on morsels of boiled leather and tree bark until rescue parties arrived in February and March 1847. Not all of the settlers were strong enough to escape, however, and those left behind were forced to cannibalize the frozen corpses of their comrades while waiting for further help. All told, roughly half of the Donner Party’s survivors eventually resorted to eating human flesh.

The rescue process took over two months.

Of the five months the Donner Party spent trapped in the mountains, nearly half of it took place after they had already been located by rescuers. The first relief parties reached the settlers in February 1846, but since pack animals were unable to navigate the deep snowdrifts, they only brought whatever food and supplies they could carry. By then, many of the emigrants were too weak to travel, and several died while trying to walk out of the mountains. Four relief teams and more than two-and-a-half months were eventually required to shepherd all the Donner Party survivors back to civilization. The last to be rescued was Lewis Keseberg, a Prussian pioneer who was found in April 1847, supposedly half-mad and surrounded by the cannibalized bodies of his former companions. Keseberg was later accused of having murdered the other emigrants for use as food, but the charges were never proven.

One rescuer singlehandedly led nine survivors out of the mountains.

Perhaps the most famous of the Donner Party’s saviors was John Stark, a burly California settler who took part in the third relief party. In early March 1847, he and two other rescuers stumbled upon 11 emigrants, mostly kids, who been left in the mountains by an earlier relief group. The two other rescuers each grabbed a single child and started hoofing it back down the slope, but Stark was unwilling to leave anyone behind. Instead, he rallied the weary adults, gathered the rest of the children and began guiding the group singlehandedly. Most of the kids were too weak to walk, so Stark took to carrying two of them at a time for a few yards, then setting them down in the snow and going back for others. He continued the grueling process all the way down the mountain, and eventually led all nine of his charges to safety. Speaking of the incident years later, one of the survivors credited her rescue to “nobody but God and Stark and the Virgin Mary.”

Only two families made it through the ordeal intact.

Of the 81 pioneers who began the Donner Party’s horrific winter in the Sierra Nevada, only 45 managed to walk out alive. The ordeal proved particularly costly for the group’s 15 solo travelers, all but two of whom died, but it also took a tragic toll on the families. George and Jacob Donner, both of their wives and four of their children all perished. Pioneer William Eddy, meanwhile, lost his wife and his two kids. Nearly a dozen families had made up Donner wagon train, but only two—the Reeds and the Breens—managed to arrive in California without suffering a single death.

APRIL 14, 2016 By Evan Andrews via History.com

Live Feed on the Roads & Temperatures of the Sierra Area

Unlike the Donner Party we have the internet and some pretty crazy technology to help us plan our travels.  Stay well informed on weather and conditions with this link that will show you a live stream of the 80, all around Lake Tahoe, and other routes near the Sierra Stake Out. Traffic, incidents, and even the temperature of the roads themselves are reported. Click HERE to stay in the know and nerd out. 

 

 

Introducing the Sierra Stake Out | A Motorcycle Camping Adventure

Welcome to Northern California Gold Country. Home of pine forests, raging rivers, clear lakes, and some of the best motorcycling in the world. The Sierra Stake Out is a 3 day 2 night campout created for motorcyclists and is located in the private Cisco Grove Campground just 70 miles east of Sacramento. Ride around pristine Lake Tahoe, pay homage to the Donner Party where they met their demise in 1846, cross some epic bridges, or hang back and cool off in our private river fed watering hole. At the campground, there’s tons of shade, dozens of places to charge equipment, fresh spring water and even some real bathrooms to accommodate our guests. The grounds feature a fully stocked camp store and a gas station is conveniently located right off the exit of our site for quick fuel ups before or after your ride for the day. The Sierra Stake Out will also feature live entertainment, a bike show, food truck, raffle, adult beverages, and a fully stocked espresso and coffee bar if you need a little pick me up. Grab your friends, pack up your gear, and join us on July 21-23rd for a weekend of moto camping and adventure in the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

Art by AAron Mason | Old rose tattoo

Art by AAron Mason | Old rose tattoo